The Amazing Health Benefits of Bone Broth

Homemade bone broth is nutritionally dense, extremely healthy and really inexpensive to make. There is more nutrition in homemade broth than store bought plus there’s no fillers. Bone broth is a savory, nutrient-dense, and collagen-rich liquid made from simmering marrow-rich animal bones (beef, chicken, turkey, pork) in water for an extended period of time.

The Amazing Health Benefits of Bone Broth

By MaryBeth | Published: December 11, 2020 | Edit

Homemade bone broth is nutritionally dense, extremely healthy and really inexpensive to make. There is more nutrition in homemade broth than store bought plus there’s no fillers. Bone broth is a savory, nutrient-dense, and collagen-rich liquid made from simmering marrow-rich animal bones (beef, chicken, turkey, pork) in water for an extended period of time.

This mineral rich infusion has an amazing taste and is an excellent source of minerals known to boost the immune system and improve digestion.
Its high in calcium, magnesium and phosphorus. Bone broth supports joints, hair, skin, and nails due to its high collagen content. Store bought bone broth has a lot of the gelatin removed.

When you or anyone in your family gets sick this broth is a soothing and immune boosting drink during illness. Sipping on a mug of broth throughout the day helps immensely even when the person doesn’t feel like eating. Bone broth is used to braise meats and vegetables as well as in soups, sauces and stews. As you can see, there are many ways to get bone broth in your diet and even prevent sickness by having a healthy immune system.

There are several places to find good bones for stock: I save leftovers from when I roast a chicken, turkey, or beef roast. If there’s a local butcher in your area especially one who butchers the whole animal will have good bones.

If you are using raw beef bones, it improves the flavor to roast them in the oven first. I place them in a roasting pan and roast for 30 minutes at 350.

Bone Broth Recipe

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds (or more) of bones
  • 1 onion
  • 2 carrots
  • 2 stalks of celery
  • 3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1 large pinch of sea salt and black pepper
  • 2 large stock pots
  • Strainer

Directions

  • If you are using raw beef bones, the flavor is improved when the bones are roasted in the oven first. I place them in a roasting pan and roast for 30 minutes at 350.
  • Then, place the bones in a large stock pot and pour water over the bones and add the vinegar. Let sit for 20–30 minutes in the cool water. The acid helps make the nutrients in the bones more available.
  • Rough chop and add the vegetables to the pot. Add the sea salt and pepper.
  • Now, bring the broth to a boil. Once it has reached a vigorous boil, reduce to a simmer and cover.
  • During the first few hours of simmering, you’ll need to remove the impurities that float to the surface. A frothy/foamy layer forms and it can be easily scooped off with a big spoon.
  • Cook for 24 hours for chicken or turkey bones and 48 hours for beef bones.
  • Remove from heat and let cool slightly. Strain into another large pot using a colander to remove all the bits of bone and vegetable.
  • Now you have several options on storing your broth. You can freeze it in freezer bags, ice cube trays, store in a container in the fridge or for long time storage pressure can your broth.

Directions For Canning Bone Broth

  • Bring the pot of broth to a boil and ladle the broth into 1 quart mason jars. Leave a 1″ headspace, wipe the rim, center the lid, tighten the ring finger tight and place it back into the canner.
  • If you have hard water add some white vinegar to the canner water. This way there won’t be mineral deposits on your canning jars.
  • Once you have all of your jars prepared, place the lid on your canner and allow it to vent before placing the weight on.
  • Bring the canner to the appropriate pressure for your altitude (see your owners manual).
  • Process the pint jars for 20 minutes. Quart jars for 40 minutes.
  • Finish processing by allowing the canner to come down to 0 pressure naturally, remove the lid and allow the jars to sit for an additional 2 minutes before removing to a towel lined counter.
  • Allow to sit completely undisturbed for 12 hours before checking the seal. If it didn’t seal, put it in the refrigerator and use within a few days. If it sealed, label it and store it in your pantry.

When illness strikes, drink bone broth until you start feeling better as it supports your body but is very easy to digest so the body’s energy can go to healing. In cases of stomach bugs or vomiting, bone broth often calms the stomach very quickly and helps shorten the duration of the illness.

Wise Woman, Herbalist & Reiki practitioner. Subscribe to my blog at https://herbalmusings.net & receive a free guide to making salves & oils.

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